Yik Yak, The Anonymous App That Wants To Compete With Twitter

The anonymous social network Applicationyak has raised $ 62 million. Afte r settling in American campuses, he will have to cross the international stage.

Silicon Valley is racing for a new social network. The sultry Applicationyak based on anonymity and geolocation, raised $ 62 million a few days ago, according to an article in the Wall Street Journal .The US start-up is valued at least 300 million dollars, just over a year after it was created.

The mobile application, little known outside the United States, is a case thanks to word-of-mouth in American universities and colleges. Based on the anonymity of its users, it is often compared to two other anonymous applications, Secret and Whisper. While the latter two are more used for confessions or to spread rumors of Silicon Valley , Yik Yak aims instead to compete with Twitter. Messages, limited to 200 characters, are displayed chronologically and appear less than 3 kilometers away. It is nevertheless possible to look at the messages (or “Yaks”) posted from any place.

The anonymous social network Yik Yak has raised $ 62 million. After settling in American campuses, he will have to cross the international stage.

Silicon Valley is racing for a new social network. The sultry Applicationyak based on anonymity and geolocation, raised $ 62 million a few days ago, according to an article in the Wall Street Journal .The US start-up is valued at least 300 million dollars, just over a year after it was created.

The mobile application, little known outside the United States, is a case thanks to word-of-mouth in American universities and colleges. Based on the anonymity of its users, it is often compared to two other anonymous applications, Secret and Whisper. While the latter two are more used for confessions or to spread rumors of Silicon Valley , Yik Yak aims instead to compete with Twitter. Messages, limited to 200 characters, are displayed chronologically and appear less than 3 kilometers away. It is nevertheless possible to look at the messages (or “Yaks”) posted from any place.

Even if the Applicationyak  is reserved for people over 18, some high school students enjoy the anonymity of their remarks to indulge in online harassment or pranks with sometimes serious consequences. Yik Yak has been involved in several bomb threats in high schools, including California last week . In recent months, the scandals about the application have also made it possible to speak about it in the big American media.

In order not to cool potential investors, the leaders of the start-up multiply the precautions. A system of “geofencing” ( virtual guarding) has been put in place: thanks to a partnership with a digital mapping company, Yik Yak prevents the sending of messages from 85% of American schools. On the other hand, the start-up relies heavily on universities, which it highlights in its internal search engine. Like Facebook, which first spread to American campuses before becoming one of the biggest players in the Net, Yik Yak wants to develop through university networks. Focused on their campuses, students use the application as a cork bulletin board, or as the walls of their toilets, according to the elegance of the messages posted.

International, next challenge for Yik Yak

This new fundraising will accelerate the international development of the Applicationyak . The start-up is also looking for student ambassadors in foreign countries, giving them a letter of recommendation from Tyler Droll, the boss of Yik Yak. The Applicationyak  is not yet translated into other languages, the focus is on the Anglo-Saxon countries, although there is an offer for ambassadors from all countries

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *